Disney History – November 22

This Day in Disney History November 22

1963

Walt Disney in Florida - 1960's
Walt Disney in Florida – 1960’s ©Disney

1963: Walt decides on Florida for the location of Walt Disney World

From Disney Parks Blog:
“Well, that’s the place – Florida,” Walt Disney reportedly decided on a flight from New Orleans to Burbank, Calif. on November 22, 1963 – 50 years ago today. Walt and a group of company executives had just toured east coast sites in an effort to find the best location for a “Disneyland East.” But those words confirmed Walt’s choice for his “whole new Disney World.”

In the end, the property that would become Walt Disney World Resort was purchased at an average price of $180 dollars an acre – an incredible feat considering that shortly after the announcement was made, a nearby acre sold for more than $300,000!
[read more]

From D23:
Many have likened this mystery to a James Bond thriller. Or, as Disney Legend Joe Potter put it, “a real Perry Mason.” While the “secret agent” of the mid-1960s land acquisition of parcels that would one day comprise the Walt Disney World Resort may not be the star of a popular film or television series, Walt spearheaded a project so vast that many have wondered what really happened behind the closed doors of the planning rooms and through the Orlando forests nearly a half-century ago.
[read more] – you need to log into a FREE D23.com account to access the article…

Walt Disney, Florida Governor and Roy Disney Announce Walt Disney World Resort, November 15, 1965


1985

Disney's One Magic Christmas - 1985
Theatrical Release Poster

1985: “One Magic Christmas” is Released

From Wikipedia:
One Magic Christmas is a 1985 American/Canadian Christmas fantasy film directed by Phillip Borsos. It was released by Walt Disney Pictures and stars Mary Steenburgen and Harry Dean Stanton. It was shot in Meaford, Ontario with some scenes in Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada.
[read more]

From D23:
Various elements of realism were brought to the film, including Santa’s workshop and cottage, which were filled with actual rare toys insured for $1 million before filming. The propmasters must have shouted out with glee during one scene, which used 20,000 actual letters to Santa from the city of Toronto’s main post office.
[read more] – you need to log into a FREE D23.com account to access the article…


1991

Disney Beauty and the Beast - 1991
North American theatrical teaser poster

1991: Walt Disney Pictures releases it’s 30th animated feature, “Beauty and the Beast

From Wikipedia:
Based on the French fairy tale of the same name by Jeanne-Marie Le Prince de Beaumont, Beauty and the Beast is the 30th film in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series, and the third film of the Disney Renaissance.

Walt Disney attempted to adapt “Beauty and the Beast” into an animated feature film during the 1930s and 1950s, but was unsuccessful. Following the unprecedented success of The Little Mermaid (1989), Walt Disney Feature Animation decided to adapt the fairy tale, originally conceived by then-director Richard Purdum as a non-musical. Disney chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg eventually discontinued the idea and ordered that the film be a musical similar to The Little Mermaid instead, resulting in Purdum’s resignation.

At the time Beauty and the Beast was the most successful animated Disney film release, and the first animated film to reach $100 million in North America.
[read more]

From D23:
As with all the great Disney animated classics, powerful storywork, artful songs and music, and brilliant personality animation combined to make Beauty and the Beast an unforgettable cinematic narrative that for many people has become the version of the famous tale. “Doing your own version of Beauty and the Beast is as much a tradition as is the story itself,” Don Hahn explains. “Part of the fun is that each generation and culture adapts this story to be its own. The themes—you can’t judge a book by its cover, and beauty is only skin deep—are as relevant today as ever.”
[read more] – you need to log into a FREE D23.com account to access the article…


1995

Disney/Pixar Toy Story 1995
Theatrical release poster

1995: Walt Disney Pictures/Pixar Animation Studios release “Toy Story

From Wikipedia:
Toy Story was the first feature-length computer-animated film and the first film produced by Pixar. Toy Story follows a group of anthropomorphic toys who pretend to be lifeless whenever humans are present, and focuses on the relationship between Woody, a pullstring cowboy doll (Tom Hanks), and Buzz Lightyear, an astronaut action figure (Tim Allen).

The top-grossing film on its opening weekend, Toy Story went on to earn over $361 million worldwide. Reviews were entirely positive, praising both the animation’s technical innovation and the screenplay’s wit and sophistication, and it is now widely considered by many critics to be one of the best animated films ever made.
[read more]

From D23:
The film is the first animated feature ever generated completely on computers, produced as part of a partnership between Disney and Northern California-based Pixar. John Lasseter was presented a special Academy Award for “the development and inspired application of techniques that have made possible the first feature-length computer-animated film.”
[read more] – you need to log into a FREE D23.com account to access the article…